How It Works

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Many factors affect the cost of heating and cooling your home. Especially after a hurricane or other natural disaster, heating costs for your Dumas, Texas, home are likely to increase substantially. One way to save money, keep bills low, and make a positive impact on the environment is to go with geothermal temperature control.

What Is Geothermal?

Geothermal heating and cooling uses the earth’s crust to regulate temperatures in your home. The ground is warmer than the outside in the winter and cooler in the summer. If you’ve ever been in a cave during the heat of the summer, the temperature difference is obvious. This type of heating and cooling system relies on this phenomenon to regulate the temperaure in a home.

How Does Geothermal Work?

Geothermal systems have two parts: the heat pump and the ground loop. The heat pump is inside your home and pumps liquid through the ground loop. The ground loop is a series of liquid-filled pipes that run vertically or horizontally underground.

In colder months, the heat pump moves liquid through the ground loop, and it becomes heated from the warmer ground. The heat pump takes the heat from the liquid and pumps it into your home. The liquid returns to the ground loop to start the process over again.

In the summer, the heat pump takes heat from indoor air and transfers it to the liquid, leaving behind cooler air that’s pumped into your home. The warmth from the liquid gets dispersed into the cooler ground.

Benefits of Geothermal

Since this system transfers energy instead of creating it, it costs less to use. The only electricity used in geothermal systems operates the fan, pump, and compressor. These systems are quiet because there’s no outdoor unit; they’re about as loud as your fridge. They don’t create carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, or any greenhouse gases, making them one of the most environmentally friendly ways to heat and cool your home.

If you’re interested in geothermal systems, call Winkelman Heating and Air Conditioning at 806-553-4698.

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